July 2021 was the hottest month in history

Many have suspected our dear Earth is hotter than ever — the NOAA has now presented data that statistically proves it. Last month was the hottest in recorded history and it seems this is a shadow of things to come… check out their summary with links to more details here.

Photo collage from NOAA

Reduce your carbon footprint with gardening : Becoming self-sufficient – Gardening Australia

Jerry shares tips on how you can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from your garden.

Global warming is a global phenomenon but there’s many things gardeners can do to help on a local scale. Jerry uses battery powered tools that can be recharged via the solar power on his roof which prevents greenhouse gas emissions. A push-driven mower also has no reliance on fuels and starts first time every time! Growing plants helps store carbon in soils by taking carbon dioxide in from the atmosphere and turning it into plant tissue. Mangroves are some of best plant communities for storing carbon but trees like eucalypts are great choices with small varieties available for the home garden, and if providing shade on the northern or western side of your house you’ll need less air conditioning to keep cool and save on emissions that way too.

Composting garden and kitchen waste where possible will avoid emissions from councils having to take your waste to the tip. And the compost won’t just increase biological activity, water holding capacity, and fertility of your soil, it will also store carbon! The earth can store ten times more carbon in the soil than it can in the atmosphere. Jerry regularly measures the amount of carbon in his soil and it’s increasing by about 1% each year, which means he’s stopping a huge amount of greenhouse gas getting into the atmosphere just by working in homemade compost.

Choosing the right fertiliser is also important and Jerry uses organic fertiliser like animal manures as they have the nutrients your plants need whilst avoiding the greenhouse gases emitted in the production of synthetic fertilisers. Synthetic fertilisers can also generate nitrous oxide in the soil, a potent greenhouse gas.

The distance food has to be transported to get to you is known as ‘food miles’. The greater the food miles the greater the fossil fuel emissions resulting from the food you consume. But food grown at home only has to go from garden to kitchen! Most of the onions eaten in Brisbane come from South Australia or Tasmania, as they can be unreliable to grow in the Queensland climate. So, Jerry grow subtropical substitutes like spring onion and society garlic that are just as easy and tasty as ordinary onions. Citrus fruits are an internationally traded commodity but with a little space you can grow one at home and they are very rewarding!

Don’t despair about global warming, get into your patch and do something about it.

Yuggera Country | Brisbane, QLD

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Heat causes some Australian birds to go quiet

If you’re in Australia and wonder why the singing birds often go silent when it gets hot — check out this insightful article from ABC News Australia with insights from Dr. Gisela Kaplan (a Professor in Animal Behaviour at the University of New England) who has conducted and published extensive research about avian habits.

Many birds use a lot of energy to stay cool in the heat of the day, and only forage when it’s cool. (Supplied: Mick Roderick, BirdLife Australia)

ABC News – 11 Dec 2020

Covid-19 is bad… Could Climate Change even Worse?

A brief article by Bill Gates published on his blog compares the environmental impact (or lack thereof) of Covid and it similarities with climate change.

It’s not that climate change will be disastrous. If we learn the lessons of COVID-19, we can approach climate change more informed about the consequences of inaction, and more prepared to save lives and prevent the worst possible outcome. The current global crisis can inform our response to the next one.

Bill’s other salient observations include:

  1. Let science and innovation lead the way.
  2. Make sure solutions work for poor countries too.
  3. Start now.

Visit Bill Gates Blog