Help Save the Great Glider

An estimated 26 per cent of the greater glider population in East Gippsland, Victoria, was killed in the 2019–2020 bushfire catastrophe, when more than
1.5 million ha of Victoria’s bushland burned. This is a devastating blow to the population of the already threatened species.

The Victorian National Parks Association hopes to secure habitat for the surviving greater gliders by launching a campaign to protect Wombat State Forest, the westernmost part of the species’ range. Being designated state forest, it can be logged at any time. But the campaign hopes to protect the forest by proposing that it be turned into a new national park.

Make a difference. Please donate today. Funds raised will help save and support the greater glider population.

If you’re interested in supporting other environmental projects — we encourage you to consider the Australian Geographic Society Fundraising efforts. Check out their current campaigns.

How to photograph wildlife ethically

PHOTOGRAPH BY FRANS LANTING, NAT GEO IMAGE COLLECTION

Our friends at National Geographic have built a long history and stellar reputation documenting our world with captivating photographs and educational stories. As tourism numbers swell and wildlife habitat shrink — its more important than ever to respect and preserve wildlife and photos continue to be a powerful tool to communicate and achieve this.

A number of National Geographic photographers have shared their insights and experience in capturing compelling photos while maintaining an ethical respect for the animals being photographed. Its important to not let your sense of urgency or immediacy overshadow the animal’s circumstance nor impact their habitat or behaviour.

Read the full article at National Geographic.